Russell D. Hunt, Sr, Attorney at Law
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How the Fifth Amendment protects those accused of crimes

Facing criminal charges is a scary thing. Depending on the seriousness of the alleged crime, you could risk anything from jail time to the death penalty in Texas. Knowing your rights before you get into legal trouble is the best option, but many people aren't fully aware of their rights as American citizens. That can lead to mistakes both when dealing with law enforcement and when strategizing for your criminal defense.

Specifically, understanding when you should speak and when you should remain silent is often a difficult decision. This is particularly true because law enforcement will do their best to get you to waive your rights, and prosecutors in court will try to get you to say something incriminating. Standing up for yourself is important with law enforcement, and it is also important when you wind up in court.

The Fifth Amendment protects you against self-incrimination

If it has been a while since you have taken a civics course, you may not recall which amendment offers which protection. The Fifth Amendment specifically protects individuals against forced self-incrimination. Neither law enforcement nor the courts can compel you to say anything that will impact your ability to defend yourself.

Many people are somewhat familiar with the Fifth Amendment, as it is popularly used in law enforcement and crime dramas when defendants plead the Fifth. Pleading the Fifth means that you choose not to answer questions in a court of law that your oath would otherwise compel you to answer. However, your right to avoid self-incrimination actually starts the moment law enforcement officers arrest you.

The Fifth Amendment is one reason you have to hear your Miranda Rights

Those who are familiar with pleading the Fifth from crime dramas will likely also be familiar with Miranda rights. On television shows and movies, officers usually recite the Miranda Rights while they are in the process of placing an individual under arrest. In reality, the law does not require that officers give people information about their Miranda rights during an arrest.

Instead, officers should read the Miranda rights to an individual about to experience questioning or interrogation. If law enforcement engages in questioning someone without advising them of their right to remain silent, it may be grounds for an attorney to challenge anything said during that initial interview.

Of course, it is a far better strategy to avoid making incriminating statements in the first place. That is why it is advisable to contact a criminal defense attorney before subjecting yourself to questioning by law enforcement. Knowing your rights makes it easier to stand up for them. Flexing your rights with law enforcement and with the courts may feel frightening, but it can help you avoid an unfair conviction.

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  • Texas Criminal Defense Lawyers Association
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Russell D. Hunt, Sr, Attorney at Law

425 Austin Avenue
Suite 1208
P.O. Box 726
Waco, TX 76701

Phone: 254-304-6354
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